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  Collective Bargaining
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10
 
Diamond, Stephen F.. From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy (Vandeplas Publishing, 2009)

Abstract:
From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy argues that globalization is not a progressive force that is giving rise to a new democratic capitalism. In fact, authoritarianism, in part influenced by neo-stalinist regimes and their intellectual architects such as 'Che' Guevara, remains an important political force and the new global capitalism itself is contributing to its persistence. In particular, the labor organization is now seen by authoritarian regimes as a source of power and control over the general population. To realize the democratic potential in the globalization process, a new autonomous labor movement responsible to its rank and file members must emerge. This requires an intellectual break with the consensus view that capitalism can safely accommodate healthy trade unions in a stable world order.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Globalization
Newsletter: Vol 9, Issue 5
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Mcintyre, Richard. Are Worker Rights Human Rights? (University of Michigan Press, 2008)

Abstract:
The controversy over labor standards is one of the central controversies in the globalization debate. This book draws on the Institutional and Marxist traditions to present an economic analysis of labor standards that takes both moral questions and class relations and interests seriously. It argues that a prime tendency in the contemporary world economy is the lengthening of commodity chains through which the employer washes his hands of moral responsibility. This is true in globalized production networks and in temporary and subcontracted work in the United States. Although popular organizations assert the rights of workers against such practices, supporters of such slogans as "worker rights are human rights" often fail to distinguish between individual and collective rights and the the effect of class interest on the definition of rights. The author examines the practices of the International Labor Organization (ILO), interaction between labor law and U.S. foreign policy, and activities of labor-based nongovernmental organizations in creating worker rights and enforcing labor standards. He argues that in a global economy, workers must assert their collective rights as workers in order to win human rights as individuals. The best hope for achieving workers' rights lies in grassroots labor organizations that claim the right of association and collective bargaining.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, Collective Bargaining, Corporate Codes of Conduct
Newsletter: Vol 8, Issue 1
 
Pranab Bardham & Samuel Bowles & Michael Wallerstein. Globalization and Egalitarian Redistribution (Princeton University Press, 2006)

Abstract:
This collection addresses the impact of globalization on the capacity and political will of nations to pursue egalitarian domestic policies. Essays explore the impact of global pressures on domestic dynamics such as collective bargaining, social policy formation, social insurance, tax policy, and immigration policy. The essays also compare the impact of globalization on rich, poor, and middle income countries. They include specific discussions of the United States, the European Union, the Nordic countries, and Australia as well as large multi-nation empirical comparisons. Contributors include Keith Banting, Pranab Bardham, Carles Boix, Samuel Bowles, Minsik Choi, Richard Johnston, Covadonga Meseguer Yebra, Karl Ove Moene, Layna Mosley, Clause Offe, Ugo Pageno, Adam Przeworski, Kenneth Scheve, Matthew J. Slaughter, Stuart Soroka, and Michael Wallerstein.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Immigration
Newsletter: Vol 6, Issue 1

  Comparative Labor Law
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10

  Contingent Work
 
Stone, Katherine V. W. From Widgets to Digits: Employment Regulation for the Changing Workplace (Cambridge University Press, 2004)

Abstract:
From Widgets to Digits is about the changing nature of the employment relationship and its implications for labor and employment law. For most of the twentieth century, employers fostered long-term employment relationships through the use of implicit promises of job security, well-defined hierarchical job ladders, and longevity-based wage and benefit schemes. Today’s employers no longer value longevity or seek to encourage long-term attachment between the employee and the firm. Instead employers seek flexibility in their employment relationships. As a result, employees now operate as free agents in a boundaryless workplace, in which they move across departmental lines within firms, and across firm borders, throughout their working lives. Today’s challenge is to find a means to provide workers with continuity in wages, on-going training opportunities, sustainable and transferable skills, unambiguous ownership of their human capital, portable benefits, and an infrastructure of support structures to enable them to weather career transitions.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Contingent Work
Newsletter: Vol 3, Issue 9
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 

  Corporate Accountability
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10

  Corporate Codes of Conduct
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10
 
Mcintyre, Richard. Are Worker Rights Human Rights? (University of Michigan Press, 2008)

Abstract:
The controversy over labor standards is one of the central controversies in the globalization debate. This book draws on the Institutional and Marxist traditions to present an economic analysis of labor standards that takes both moral questions and class relations and interests seriously. It argues that a prime tendency in the contemporary world economy is the lengthening of commodity chains through which the employer washes his hands of moral responsibility. This is true in globalized production networks and in temporary and subcontracted work in the United States. Although popular organizations assert the rights of workers against such practices, supporters of such slogans as "worker rights are human rights" often fail to distinguish between individual and collective rights and the the effect of class interest on the definition of rights. The author examines the practices of the International Labor Organization (ILO), interaction between labor law and U.S. foreign policy, and activities of labor-based nongovernmental organizations in creating worker rights and enforcing labor standards. He argues that in a global economy, workers must assert their collective rights as workers in order to win human rights as individuals. The best hope for achieving workers' rights lies in grassroots labor organizations that claim the right of association and collective bargaining.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, Collective Bargaining, Corporate Codes of Conduct
Newsletter: Vol 8, Issue 1

  Country-Specific Case Studies
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10
 
Diamond, Stephen F.. From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy (Vandeplas Publishing, 2009)

Abstract:
From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy argues that globalization is not a progressive force that is giving rise to a new democratic capitalism. In fact, authoritarianism, in part influenced by neo-stalinist regimes and their intellectual architects such as 'Che' Guevara, remains an important political force and the new global capitalism itself is contributing to its persistence. In particular, the labor organization is now seen by authoritarian regimes as a source of power and control over the general population. To realize the democratic potential in the globalization process, a new autonomous labor movement responsible to its rank and file members must emerge. This requires an intellectual break with the consensus view that capitalism can safely accommodate healthy trade unions in a stable world order.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Globalization
Newsletter: Vol 9, Issue 5
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Gross A., James, Ed.. Workers' Rights as Human Rights (ILR Press, 2003)

Abstract:
This collected volume, edited by James A. Gross, approaches various questions of US labor relations law from an international human rights perspective. Representing both labor and employer views, these authors debate such issues such: whether US labor law violates ILO core labor standards; whether human rights are in fact universal; what should be done to bring US labor law into conformity with international human rights standards; and whether health and safety protections ought be included in international core labor regimes. Other contributors claim that the efforts of workers themselves—through increased transnational solidarity and labor/community alliances—hold the secret to the advancement of workers rights. In sum, each chapter of the volume offers a variant perspective on the intersection between US labor law and human rights. This book contains contributions by: James A. Gross, Lance Compa, Lee Swepston, Emily A. Spieler, Edward E. Potter, Thomas B. Moorhead, Roy J. Adams, James Atleson, Linda A. Lotz, Reverend Jim Lewis.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, ILO, United Nations
Newsletter: Vol 3, Issue 3
 
Pranab Bardham & Samuel Bowles & Michael Wallerstein. Globalization and Egalitarian Redistribution (Princeton University Press, 2006)

Abstract:
This collection addresses the impact of globalization on the capacity and political will of nations to pursue egalitarian domestic policies. Essays explore the impact of global pressures on domestic dynamics such as collective bargaining, social policy formation, social insurance, tax policy, and immigration policy. The essays also compare the impact of globalization on rich, poor, and middle income countries. They include specific discussions of the United States, the European Union, the Nordic countries, and Australia as well as large multi-nation empirical comparisons. Contributors include Keith Banting, Pranab Bardham, Carles Boix, Samuel Bowles, Minsik Choi, Richard Johnston, Covadonga Meseguer Yebra, Karl Ove Moene, Layna Mosley, Clause Offe, Ugo Pageno, Adam Przeworski, Kenneth Scheve, Matthew J. Slaughter, Stuart Soroka, and Michael Wallerstein.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Immigration
Newsletter: Vol 6, Issue 1
 
Sarfati, Hedva & Bonoli, Giuliano. Labor Market and Social Protection Reforms in International Perspective: Parallel or Converging Tracks? ((Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2002),

Abstract:
This edited volume is a collection of International Social Security Administration (ISSA) case studies that explores the potential for institutional adaptation in changing socioeconomic circumstances. The case studies are from in a variety of European countries, the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. They describe restructuring of social protection and labor market reforms and assesses the outcomes of these cases. The changing circumstances highlighted by the authors include the increase in service sector employment and the subsequent changes in the rate and character of productivity gains. The liberalization of social and labor regulation and the mobility of both capital and production are also identified as key factors motivating institutional adaptation. Finally the authors point to the aging of the population and a pending crisis in social welfare policy.

Subjects: European Union, Country-Specific Case Studies
Newsletter: Vol 2, Issue 11

  Employment Law
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10

  European Union
 
Sarfati, Hedva & Bonoli, Giuliano. Labor Market and Social Protection Reforms in International Perspective: Parallel or Converging Tracks? ((Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2002),

Abstract:
This edited volume is a collection of International Social Security Administration (ISSA) case studies that explores the potential for institutional adaptation in changing socioeconomic circumstances. The case studies are from in a variety of European countries, the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. They describe restructuring of social protection and labor market reforms and assesses the outcomes of these cases. The changing circumstances highlighted by the authors include the increase in service sector employment and the subsequent changes in the rate and character of productivity gains. The liberalization of social and labor regulation and the mobility of both capital and production are also identified as key factors motivating institutional adaptation. Finally the authors point to the aging of the population and a pending crisis in social welfare policy.

Subjects: European Union, Country-Specific Case Studies
Newsletter: Vol 2, Issue 11

  Globalization
 
Diamond, Stephen F.. From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy (Vandeplas Publishing, 2009)

Abstract:
From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy argues that globalization is not a progressive force that is giving rise to a new democratic capitalism. In fact, authoritarianism, in part influenced by neo-stalinist regimes and their intellectual architects such as 'Che' Guevara, remains an important political force and the new global capitalism itself is contributing to its persistence. In particular, the labor organization is now seen by authoritarian regimes as a source of power and control over the general population. To realize the democratic potential in the globalization process, a new autonomous labor movement responsible to its rank and file members must emerge. This requires an intellectual break with the consensus view that capitalism can safely accommodate healthy trade unions in a stable world order.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Globalization
Newsletter: Vol 9, Issue 5
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 

  ILO
 
Alston, Philip, Ed.. Labor Rights as Human Rights (Oxford, 2005)

Abstract:
What is the actual and potential relationship of globalization and labor rights, and what is the future of the ILO? This book's six topical essays and editor's introduction question the possibilities and limitations of a universalistic labor rights regime in the era when international efforts are focused on market liberalization, and when institutional de-regulation and the voluntarization of rights are major trends. International agreements such as the WTO, EU, UNCTAD and NAFTA could promote labor rights, but their rhetoric thus far has been hollow. If anything is to be done, it will be through the ILO holding these institutions accountable to the rights they articulate. Though the ILO has been marginalized, if labor rights are to be taken seriously in years ahead, it should articulate a vision of labor rights as fundamental human rights, not just practical guidelines. As Steve Charnovitz notes in his chapter on the labor dimension of the FTAA and as Alston concludes, voluntary codes need not be meaningless if they are effectively monitored by the ILO and by labor advocates. The volume also contains contributions by Simon Deakin, Patrick Macklem, Francis Maupain, A.C.L. Davies and Tonia Novitz.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, WTO
Newsletter: Vol 5, Issue 4
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Gross A., James, Ed.. Workers' Rights as Human Rights (ILR Press, 2003)

Abstract:
This collected volume, edited by James A. Gross, approaches various questions of US labor relations law from an international human rights perspective. Representing both labor and employer views, these authors debate such issues such: whether US labor law violates ILO core labor standards; whether human rights are in fact universal; what should be done to bring US labor law into conformity with international human rights standards; and whether health and safety protections ought be included in international core labor regimes. Other contributors claim that the efforts of workers themselves—through increased transnational solidarity and labor/community alliances—hold the secret to the advancement of workers rights. In sum, each chapter of the volume offers a variant perspective on the intersection between US labor law and human rights. This book contains contributions by: James A. Gross, Lance Compa, Lee Swepston, Emily A. Spieler, Edward E. Potter, Thomas B. Moorhead, Roy J. Adams, James Atleson, Linda A. Lotz, Reverend Jim Lewis.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, ILO, United Nations
Newsletter: Vol 3, Issue 3
 
Mcintyre, Richard. Are Worker Rights Human Rights? (University of Michigan Press, 2008)

Abstract:
The controversy over labor standards is one of the central controversies in the globalization debate. This book draws on the Institutional and Marxist traditions to present an economic analysis of labor standards that takes both moral questions and class relations and interests seriously. It argues that a prime tendency in the contemporary world economy is the lengthening of commodity chains through which the employer washes his hands of moral responsibility. This is true in globalized production networks and in temporary and subcontracted work in the United States. Although popular organizations assert the rights of workers against such practices, supporters of such slogans as "worker rights are human rights" often fail to distinguish between individual and collective rights and the the effect of class interest on the definition of rights. The author examines the practices of the International Labor Organization (ILO), interaction between labor law and U.S. foreign policy, and activities of labor-based nongovernmental organizations in creating worker rights and enforcing labor standards. He argues that in a global economy, workers must assert their collective rights as workers in order to win human rights as individuals. The best hope for achieving workers' rights lies in grassroots labor organizations that claim the right of association and collective bargaining.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, Collective Bargaining, Corporate Codes of Conduct
Newsletter: Vol 8, Issue 1

  Immigration
 
Pranab Bardham & Samuel Bowles & Michael Wallerstein. Globalization and Egalitarian Redistribution (Princeton University Press, 2006)

Abstract:
This collection addresses the impact of globalization on the capacity and political will of nations to pursue egalitarian domestic policies. Essays explore the impact of global pressures on domestic dynamics such as collective bargaining, social policy formation, social insurance, tax policy, and immigration policy. The essays also compare the impact of globalization on rich, poor, and middle income countries. They include specific discussions of the United States, the European Union, the Nordic countries, and Australia as well as large multi-nation empirical comparisons. Contributors include Keith Banting, Pranab Bardham, Carles Boix, Samuel Bowles, Minsik Choi, Richard Johnston, Covadonga Meseguer Yebra, Karl Ove Moene, Layna Mosley, Clause Offe, Ugo Pageno, Adam Przeworski, Kenneth Scheve, Matthew J. Slaughter, Stuart Soroka, and Michael Wallerstein.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Immigration
Newsletter: Vol 6, Issue 1

  Labor Mobility
 
Bercusson, Brian & Estlund, Cynthia. Regulating Labour in the Wake of Globalisation: New Challenges, New Institutions. Oxford and Portland, Oregon (Hart Publishing, 2008)

Abstract:
This edited volume comprises eleven substantive chapters and a short but richly detailed introductory chapter by labor relations scholars from Europe and North America. The Editors pose the overarching question of where regulatory efforts should be centered in an era in which capital, product and labor mobility mean that neither government regulation nor collective bargaining have the power they once did. Should the locus of regulation be downward to smaller units of governance or firms themselves, "upward" to transnational institutions, or even "outward" to NGOs? The articles, by leading experts such as Harry Arthurs, Simon Deakin, Keith Ewing, Bob Hepple, Katherine Stone, and others, describe different contemporary scenarios in corporate self-regulation, transnational labor monitoring, employment contracts, privatization, transnational governance, and cross-border trade unions. Together they examine the efficacy and democratic legitimacy of different forms of regulation, the goals and values underlying regulatory approaches, and possibilities for new directions in regulatory reform. This book is an insightful, detailed, very well informed overview of what is at stake in, and what are the possibilities for, the immediate and long term future of labor regulation.

Subjects: Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Labor Mobility, Employment Law, Corporate Codes of Conduct, Corporate Accountability, Comparative Labor Law
Newsletter: Vol 7, Issue 10

  Labor Rights in General
 
Alston, Philip, Ed.. Labor Rights as Human Rights (Oxford, 2005)

Abstract:
What is the actual and potential relationship of globalization and labor rights, and what is the future of the ILO? This book's six topical essays and editor's introduction question the possibilities and limitations of a universalistic labor rights regime in the era when international efforts are focused on market liberalization, and when institutional de-regulation and the voluntarization of rights are major trends. International agreements such as the WTO, EU, UNCTAD and NAFTA could promote labor rights, but their rhetoric thus far has been hollow. If anything is to be done, it will be through the ILO holding these institutions accountable to the rights they articulate. Though the ILO has been marginalized, if labor rights are to be taken seriously in years ahead, it should articulate a vision of labor rights as fundamental human rights, not just practical guidelines. As Steve Charnovitz notes in his chapter on the labor dimension of the FTAA and as Alston concludes, voluntary codes need not be meaningless if they are effectively monitored by the ILO and by labor advocates. The volume also contains contributions by Simon Deakin, Patrick Macklem, Francis Maupain, A.C.L. Davies and Tonia Novitz.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, WTO
Newsletter: Vol 5, Issue 4
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Compa, Lance & Lyle, Fay. Justice For All: A Guide to Worker Rights in the Global Economy (Washington, D.C., American Center for International Labor Solidarity/AFL-CIO, 2003)

Abstract:
Justice for All is a comprehensive guide to international worker rights advocacy. Authors Lance Compa of Cornell University and Fay Lyle of the AFL-CIOs Solidarity Center provide historical overviews and contemporary case studies of national, regional and global mechanisms for advancing labor rights and labor standards, and where possible enforcing them. They cover labor rights clauses in U.S. trade laws, worker rights in regional trade agreements like those of NAFTA, Mercosur, and the European Union, and global bodies including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the International Labor Organization. Compa and Lyle also provide thorough reviews of corporate codes of conduct and of international labor solidarity campaigns.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General
Newsletter: Vol 2, Issue 11
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Diamond, Stephen F.. From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy (Vandeplas Publishing, 2009)

Abstract:
From 'Che' to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy argues that globalization is not a progressive force that is giving rise to a new democratic capitalism. In fact, authoritarianism, in part influenced by neo-stalinist regimes and their intellectual architects such as 'Che' Guevara, remains an important political force and the new global capitalism itself is contributing to its persistence. In particular, the labor organization is now seen by authoritarian regimes as a source of power and control over the general population. To realize the democratic potential in the globalization process, a new autonomous labor movement responsible to its rank and file members must emerge. This requires an intellectual break with the consensus view that capitalism can safely accommodate healthy trade unions in a stable world order.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Globalization
Newsletter: Vol 9, Issue 5
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Gross A., James, Ed.. Workers' Rights as Human Rights (ILR Press, 2003)

Abstract:
This collected volume, edited by James A. Gross, approaches various questions of US labor relations law from an international human rights perspective. Representing both labor and employer views, these authors debate such issues such: whether US labor law violates ILO core labor standards; whether human rights are in fact universal; what should be done to bring US labor law into conformity with international human rights standards; and whether health and safety protections ought be included in international core labor regimes. Other contributors claim that the efforts of workers themselves—through increased transnational solidarity and labor/community alliances—hold the secret to the advancement of workers rights. In sum, each chapter of the volume offers a variant perspective on the intersection between US labor law and human rights. This book contains contributions by: James A. Gross, Lance Compa, Lee Swepston, Emily A. Spieler, Edward E. Potter, Thomas B. Moorhead, Roy J. Adams, James Atleson, Linda A. Lotz, Reverend Jim Lewis.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, ILO, United Nations
Newsletter: Vol 3, Issue 3
 
Hepple, Bob. Social and Labor Rights in a Global Context: International and Comparative Perspectives (Cambridge, U.K., Cambridge University Press, 2002)

Abstract:
This volume assembles the proceedings of a 2001 conference at Cambridge marking the anniversary of the foundation course on Labor Law. The articles address the tension between labor rights and social rights in a variety of countries including the UK, the US, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and South Africa. The articles also take up the problematic intersection of regional and international social and labor rights edicts as they clash with national regulation and implementation frameworks. The key organizing question of the volume is: Does the new rhetoric of social rights --- as embodied in instruments such as the ILO declaration of Fundamental Rights and Principles at work (1998) and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights (2000) --- match the reality of the new world of market regulation and global inequality? The authors point out the difficulties, institutional and political, in managing new regulations as most governments think flexibility is critical for economic competitiveness. They point out that current social and labor rights have eroded in recent years and that new regulations tend to focus on individual rather than collective rights. In addition, constitutionalization does not appear to solve the problem of enforcement and lack of enforcement promotes competition between places. The authors see a possibility for grassroots mobilization to motivate the integration of social and labor rights beyond the existing institutional frameworks. Contributers include: Lord Wedderburn, Paul O'Higgins, Manfred Weiss, Silvana Sciarra, Catherine Barnard, Simon Deakin, Ivan Hare, Antoine Lyon-Caen, Cynthia L. Estlund, Takashi Araki and Bob Hepple.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General
Newsletter: Vol 2, Issue 10
 
Mcintyre, Richard. Are Worker Rights Human Rights? (University of Michigan Press, 2008)

Abstract:
The controversy over labor standards is one of the central controversies in the globalization debate. This book draws on the Institutional and Marxist traditions to present an economic analysis of labor standards that takes both moral questions and class relations and interests seriously. It argues that a prime tendency in the contemporary world economy is the lengthening of commodity chains through which the employer washes his hands of moral responsibility. This is true in globalized production networks and in temporary and subcontracted work in the United States. Although popular organizations assert the rights of workers against such practices, supporters of such slogans as "worker rights are human rights" often fail to distinguish between individual and collective rights and the the effect of class interest on the definition of rights. The author examines the practices of the International Labor Organization (ILO), interaction between labor law and U.S. foreign policy, and activities of labor-based nongovernmental organizations in creating worker rights and enforcing labor standards. He argues that in a global economy, workers must assert their collective rights as workers in order to win human rights as individuals. The best hope for achieving workers' rights lies in grassroots labor organizations that claim the right of association and collective bargaining.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, Collective Bargaining, Corporate Codes of Conduct
Newsletter: Vol 8, Issue 1
 
Pranab Bardham & Samuel Bowles & Michael Wallerstein. Globalization and Egalitarian Redistribution (Princeton University Press, 2006)

Abstract:
This collection addresses the impact of globalization on the capacity and political will of nations to pursue egalitarian domestic policies. Essays explore the impact of global pressures on domestic dynamics such as collective bargaining, social policy formation, social insurance, tax policy, and immigration policy. The essays also compare the impact of globalization on rich, poor, and middle income countries. They include specific discussions of the United States, the European Union, the Nordic countries, and Australia as well as large multi-nation empirical comparisons. Contributors include Keith Banting, Pranab Bardham, Carles Boix, Samuel Bowles, Minsik Choi, Richard Johnston, Covadonga Meseguer Yebra, Karl Ove Moene, Layna Mosley, Clause Offe, Ugo Pageno, Adam Przeworski, Kenneth Scheve, Matthew J. Slaughter, Stuart Soroka, and Michael Wallerstein.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, Collective Bargaining, Immigration
Newsletter: Vol 6, Issue 1
 
Stone, Katherine V. W. From Widgets to Digits: Employment Regulation for the Changing Workplace (Cambridge University Press, 2004)

Abstract:
From Widgets to Digits is about the changing nature of the employment relationship and its implications for labor and employment law. For most of the twentieth century, employers fostered long-term employment relationships through the use of implicit promises of job security, well-defined hierarchical job ladders, and longevity-based wage and benefit schemes. Today’s employers no longer value longevity or seek to encourage long-term attachment between the employee and the firm. Instead employers seek flexibility in their employment relationships. As a result, employees now operate as free agents in a boundaryless workplace, in which they move across departmental lines within firms, and across firm borders, throughout their working lives. Today’s challenge is to find a means to provide workers with continuity in wages, on-going training opportunities, sustainable and transferable skills, unambiguous ownership of their human capital, portable benefits, and an infrastructure of support structures to enable them to weather career transitions.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Contingent Work
Newsletter: Vol 3, Issue 9
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 

  NAFTA/GATT
 
Alston, Philip, Ed.. Labor Rights as Human Rights (Oxford, 2005)

Abstract:
What is the actual and potential relationship of globalization and labor rights, and what is the future of the ILO? This book's six topical essays and editor's introduction question the possibilities and limitations of a universalistic labor rights regime in the era when international efforts are focused on market liberalization, and when institutional de-regulation and the voluntarization of rights are major trends. International agreements such as the WTO, EU, UNCTAD and NAFTA could promote labor rights, but their rhetoric thus far has been hollow. If anything is to be done, it will be through the ILO holding these institutions accountable to the rights they articulate. Though the ILO has been marginalized, if labor rights are to be taken seriously in years ahead, it should articulate a vision of labor rights as fundamental human rights, not just practical guidelines. As Steve Charnovitz notes in his chapter on the labor dimension of the FTAA and as Alston concludes, voluntary codes need not be meaningless if they are effectively monitored by the ILO and by labor advocates. The volume also contains contributions by Simon Deakin, Patrick Macklem, Francis Maupain, A.C.L. Davies and Tonia Novitz.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, WTO
Newsletter: Vol 5, Issue 4
Full-text links: || Link 1 || 
 
Mcintyre, Richard. Are Worker Rights Human Rights? (University of Michigan Press, 2008)

Abstract:
The controversy over labor standards is one of the central controversies in the globalization debate. This book draws on the Institutional and Marxist traditions to present an economic analysis of labor standards that takes both moral questions and class relations and interests seriously. It argues that a prime tendency in the contemporary world economy is the lengthening of commodity chains through which the employer washes his hands of moral responsibility. This is true in globalized production networks and in temporary and subcontracted work in the United States. Although popular organizations assert the rights of workers against such practices, supporters of such slogans as "worker rights are human rights" often fail to distinguish between individual and collective rights and the the effect of class interest on the definition of rights. The author examines the practices of the International Labor Organization (ILO), interaction between labor law and U.S. foreign policy, and activities of labor-based nongovernmental organizations in creating worker rights and enforcing labor standards. He argues that in a global economy, workers must assert their collective rights as workers in order to win human rights as individuals. The best hope for achieving workers' rights lies in grassroots labor organizations that claim the right of association and collective bargaining.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, Collective Bargaining, Corporate Codes of Conduct
Newsletter: Vol 8, Issue 1

  United Nations
 
Gross A., James, Ed.. Workers' Rights as Human Rights (ILR Press, 2003)

Abstract:
This collected volume, edited by James A. Gross, approaches various questions of US labor relations law from an international human rights perspective. Representing both labor and employer views, these authors debate such issues such: whether US labor law violates ILO core labor standards; whether human rights are in fact universal; what should be done to bring US labor law into conformity with international human rights standards; and whether health and safety protections ought be included in international core labor regimes. Other contributors claim that the efforts of workers themselves—through increased transnational solidarity and labor/community alliances—hold the secret to the advancement of workers rights. In sum, each chapter of the volume offers a variant perspective on the intersection between US labor law and human rights. This book contains contributions by: James A. Gross, Lance Compa, Lee Swepston, Emily A. Spieler, Edward E. Potter, Thomas B. Moorhead, Roy J. Adams, James Atleson, Linda A. Lotz, Reverend Jim Lewis.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, Country-Specific Case Studies, ILO, United Nations
Newsletter: Vol 3, Issue 3

  WTO
 
Alston, Philip, Ed.. Labor Rights as Human Rights (Oxford, 2005)

Abstract:
What is the actual and potential relationship of globalization and labor rights, and what is the future of the ILO? This book's six topical essays and editor's introduction question the possibilities and limitations of a universalistic labor rights regime in the era when international efforts are focused on market liberalization, and when institutional de-regulation and the voluntarization of rights are major trends. International agreements such as the WTO, EU, UNCTAD and NAFTA could promote labor rights, but their rhetoric thus far has been hollow. If anything is to be done, it will be through the ILO holding these institutions accountable to the rights they articulate. Though the ILO has been marginalized, if labor rights are to be taken seriously in years ahead, it should articulate a vision of labor rights as fundamental human rights, not just practical guidelines. As Steve Charnovitz notes in his chapter on the labor dimension of the FTAA and as Alston concludes, voluntary codes need not be meaningless if they are effectively monitored by the ILO and by labor advocates. The volume also contains contributions by Simon Deakin, Patrick Macklem, Francis Maupain, A.C.L. Davies and Tonia Novitz.

Subjects: Labor Rights in General, ILO, NAFTA/GATT, WTO
Newsletter: Vol 5, Issue 4
Full-text links: || Link 1 ||